Kajukenbo Grand Masters Family Tree

Sijo Emperado

Kenpo "Emperado Method" or "Traditional Hard Style".

[edit] Tum Pai

The original style of Tum Pai was put together by Sijo Adriano D. Emperado, Al Dacascos and Al Dela Cruz in the early 60s to create an advanced style for the Kajukenbo system. In the mid-60s the developments that made up Tum Pai became incorporated into what was called "Chu'an Fa". In 1971 Jon A. Loren started incorporating the concepts of Tai-Chi and Southern Sil-lum into his Kajukenbo classes. This was called Northern Kajukenbo until 1976. In 1976, while staying with Sijo Emperado in Hawaii, he demonstrated his concepts and techniques and asked if he could call it Tum Pai and bring the name back to life. Emperado granted permission with the acknowledgment that the original Tum Pai followed a different path than the revised Tum Pai soft style. The name Tum Pai, which means "central way", fits the Tai-Chi concept blended into the Kajukenbo format.

[edit] Chu'an Fa

In Hawaii during the early 1960s Sijo Adriano Emperado, along with students Al Dacascos and Al Dela Cruz, incorporated innovations of the style Tum Pai and other martial arts into their Kajukenbo training. Later it became obvious that they were no longer doing Tum Pai and it would have to be named something else. In the mid 60s Al Dacascos moved to Northern California and continued training in the Northern and Southern styles of Sil-lum Kung Fu to enhance his Kajukenbo training. It was in 1965 that the name Ch'uan-Fa was introduced. The word Chu'an-Fa itself means "fist way" or "fist style".

[edit] Wun Hop Kuen Do

Wun Hop Kuen Do[3] was founded by Al Dacascos, in Cantonese Chinese Wun Hop Kuen Do means "combination fist art style" and in the Mandarin dialect the style would be "Quan Hur Chuen Dao". Wun Hop Kuen Do techniques identify with, and are based on, the Kajukenbo system. This martial arts style incorporates techniques from many different styles including Northern and Southern Kung Fu systems and Escrima. Since this style is always being developed it is not a fixed system. This means that practitioners of the style are always striving to improve it by the incorporation and improvement of useful methods or techniques. In addition the philosophy of remaining "unfixed" also applies to the defense techniques, in that there is no defined response to a given situation, and they attempt to fit the situation as it arises. This idea leads to self defense that is creative and allows one to think about what is the best response. This is one of the primary things that sets this style apart from most others, it is a martial art that asks you to think for yourself and use your own common sense to actually see what you should do next. There are many drills to allow practice of this type of fluidity and creativity that lead to the ability to respond reflexively to any situation — which is in contrast to many other training methods where one is supposed to mimic techniques which are often not practical, except under very defined circumstances